LAST CALL: Putrefying Stories & Theian Journal

All good things must come to an end, or in the case of these two books, reach the end of contract life and go out of print. Ergo, from right now until midnight on Sunday, January 5th, we are giving away the Kindle editions of two of our more interesting and eccentric experiments, THEIAN JOURNAL and PUTREFYING STORIES, free for the cost of a click.

THEIAN JOURNAL features:

• THE FISSURE OF ROLANDO, by Judith Field
• ADROIT, by David Williams
• TAKING A BREATHER, by Jean Davis
• A SCORPION WITHIN, by Alison Grifa Ismaili
• PLAINFIELD, NEW YORSEY: 2114, by Angele Ellis
• WHEN WE ARE WHOLE, by Gary Emmette Chandler

PUTREFYING STORIES features:

• FRUITING BODIES, by Eric Landreneau
• DADDY’S LITTLE GIRL, by Julie Frost
• FROM COLORADO, by Rose Blackthorn
• TWO ZOMBIES WALK INTO A BAR, by A. A. Leil

You can get THEIAN JOURNAL here: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B017J9LPG2

And get PUTREFYING STORIES here: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B017A5IF86

But you should get them soon, because come Monday morning, they’re gone forever.

The Sirens Call: Death Comes For Us All

The 48th issue of The Sirens Call eZine has been released! This includes my poem FOREVER MINE, drabble LEAVES, and flash fiction A CHILD NAMED SORROW.

Check it out at:
http://SirensCallPublications.com
You can download it for free from the main page!

Contributors include: Featured artist, Kent Burles; featured author, Anthony Avina; authors and poets: Edward Ahern, Ysadora Alexander, Rebecca Anderson, Rose Blackthorn, Ryan Benson, F.J. Bergmann, N. M. Brown, Lesley-Ann Campbell, Ariana R. Cherry, Rachael Clarke, Suzanne Craig-Whytock, Willow Croft, Michael D. Davis, Radar DeBoard, John H. Dromey, E. N. De Choudens, Jessica Drake-Thomas, Alyson Faye, Ivanka Frankovic Fear, Greg Fewer, Stacy Fileccia, Ryan Garcia, Andrea Goyan, Alex Grey, Lucie Guerre, Robert W. Hazel, Timothy Robert Hosey, Juleigh Howard-Hobson, Linda Imbler, Mathias Jansson, Roger Ley, Dan McKeithan, Richard Meldrum, Damascus Mincemeyer, Michael J Moore, Elizabeth Nettleton, Nichole L. Nevel-Steighner, Alexandra Ott, Shelly Redd, Ethan Robles, Chrissie Rohrman, Rich Rurshell, Kane Salzer, Amber M. Simpson – Author, Elizabeth H. Smith, Meg Smith, Shawn D. Standfast, Gregg Steighner, Andy Swindells, Sonora Taylor, Tabitha Thompson, DJ Tyrer, Elizabeth H. Smith, Eliana Vanessa, Lynn White, Sheri White, Pauline Yates, and Maura Yzmore. And always, the SCP team who work tirelessly at keeping the eZine going: Gloria Bobrowicz, Erin Lydia Prime, Lee A. Forman, and Nina D’Arcangela.

WATERLESS at the NoSleep Podcast

NoSleep Podcast S13Ep06 Waterless
Jeff Clement narrates and produces “Waterless” by Rose Blackthorn, Author in S13E06 of @NosleepPodcast! Joining him are the incredible talents of Mike DelGaudio, Peter Lewis, & Jessica McEvoy with a great synth score by Brandon Boone.

NoSleep Podcast

Season 13 plays tricks with episode 06. We have tales about those things fun and frivolous and frightening.

Mind the gap.

http://www.thenosleeppodcast.com/episodes/S13/13×06

(Art courtesy of @mark_pelham on IG)

 

 

Rose Blackthorn – Beautiful, Broken Things Review

David Spell at The Scary Reviews just posted this wonderful review – Check out the review, and I hope you’ll check out my collection Beautiful, Broken Things as well!

The Scary Reviews

Genre: Horror
Length: 262 Pages
Publisher: Crossroad Press
Release date: May 23, 2018
Synopsis: Travel to the shores of an alien sea where the search for pearls may cost more than expected. Experience the early days of Viking exploration to the New World, and learn why they didn’t stay. Meet those things that hide in the darkness of attic rooms, the shadows beyond the fenced-in yard, the narrow confines of the kitchen pipes, or even right out in the open beneath a warm summer sun. Learn to be wary of lost children, the kindness of strangers, or even the promises of those you trust. Enjoy the beauty of the sea, the lush growth of greenhouse roses, the love and longing of family, and even the fondness of old memories.

“Broken things can be useful, even beautiful…” But they can also be dangerous.

Review copy provided in exchange for an honest…

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Beautiful, Broken Things ~ a collection of short stories by Rose Blackthorn

Beautiful, Broken Things text cover

Travel to the shores of an alien sea where the search for pearls may cost more than expected. Experience the early days of Viking exploration to the New World, and learn why they didn’t stay. Meet those things that hide in the darkness of attic rooms, the shadows beyond the fenced-in yard, the narrow confines of the kitchen pipes, or even right out in the open beneath a warm summer sun. Learn to be wary of lost children, the kindness of strangers, or even the promises of those you trust. Enjoy the beauty of the sea, the lush growth of greenhouse roses, the love and longing of family, and even the fondness of old memories.

“Broken things can be useful, even beautiful…” But they can also be dangerous.

I am so very happy to announce that my first collection of short stories has been released by Crossroad Press. It is currently available in digital format at Amazon as well as other major eBook retailers, and will soon be available in print!

A super-fast note to say thanks so very-very much to Christopher Jones, Kurt Criscione, Daniele Serra, Deena Warner, David Dodd, and David Wilson for all their help in getting my collection ready to be published. Thanks to Janet Joyce Holden for the amazing introduction she wrote. And thank you to everyone who has read my stories, and encouraged me to keep writing and sharing my words with you.

Reading Book Love Heart

My Smoke-Free Anniversary

secondhandsmoke

Seven years ago today I quit smoking. I really don’t miss it, which is kind of surprising, because I loved smoking.

I had my first cigarette when I was six or seven years old. I was at a friend’s house, her older sister had swiped a pack from their parents, and she gave me one. I didn’t know how it worked–I tried to suck on the filter like a lollipop. Not too long after that, I bought my first pack from a cigarette machine in the lobby of the restaurant my family had gone to. No one said anything to a little kid buying smokes out of the machine–maybe they thought my mom or dad and had sent me to get it. Maybe they just didn’t care. I hid that pack in my dresser when I got home, sneaked a single cigarette out every few days and smoked it in the field behind our house. When my mom found the open pack, she sat me down and gave me a talking to. I don’t really remember what she said, just that she was upset and very disappointed in me.

I left them alone then, until I was thirteen. That’s when I started spending more time with a cousin who was three years older than me. She had her driver’s license, and she would come pick me up on Friday or Saturday nights to take me ice skating or to the movies, with my parents’ blessing. Then we’d go downtown and drag State Street. We’d meet boys, and hang out in the parking lot of the taco joint, and smoke and b.s. My cousin knew a little store with a drive-up window that would sell her cigarettes, and she’d buy them for me, too. When she graduated from high school a couple years later, we didn’t spend as much time together, and I more or less quit smoking.

The summer between my junior and senior year I started going to cosmetology school, which I continued throughout my senior year. During that first week, we found out the instructors would allow a “smoke break” every couple of hours. If you didn’t smoke? No breaks, except for lunch. So I started smoking again. This time, it really stuck. I smoked a pack a day, every day. I loved it. Me and my friends would go to coffee at least three times a week, and we’d sit in whichever restaurant we were frequenting at the time, drinking coffee and smoking, talking, sometimes taking turns reading my stories out loud. We partied, hung out with some of the local bands, dragged State Street again from time to time. Being a smoker was part of who I was.

In my 30s, I quit for about a year because my husband at that time had been diagnosed with the beginnings of emphysema. He tried to quit and tried to quit, and finally told me he couldn’t as long as I was still smoking. It was just too much of a temptation for him. I loved him, and I didn’t want his disease to progress. So I quit with him. When I found out a year later that he’d been smoking and hiding it from me, along with some other things he’d been hiding, I pretty much said fuck it and went out and bought a pack. It seemed a fair trade–he left, and the cigarettes returned.

Eventually, I got into a relationship with another guy. He smoked, I smoked, and we often discussed quitting. So on December 30th, seven years ago, when I finished the last cigarette in my pack, I just never bought any more. I was lucky, in that I never had any debilitating side effects. I never had the ongoing respiratory illnesses. I never had the smoker’s hack. I’ve never been diagnosed with any kind of lung or heart disease related to my many, many years of smoking. And as much as I loved to smoke, for the most part I really don’t miss it. I’ve had a couple really stressful situations where I wished I could light up, but I haven’t done so. I don’t miss going outside in the freezing cold or the blistering heat to have a smoke (and I never allowed smoking inside my house, because I think that’s just gross). I don’t miss paying for them, either. When I bought that very first pack of cigarettes from the vending machine all those years ago, they were 60¢ a pack.

I woke up this morning and looked at the date, and it occurred to me that it’s been seven years since I last smoked a cigarette. It made me think about all those years that I smoked, without ever giving it a second thought, without ever considering why. Here’s to seven more.